Family-tested solutions
for Special Needs

Toddler and mother playing together

Family-tested solutions
for Special Needs

Toddler and mother playing together

Small Steps to Worrying Less About Money

One of the most frequent items people list in their New Year’s resolutions is “get control of my spending.” However, good intentions can slip away pretty quickly. Not many people love to make a budget or do financial planning for the future. It can sound complicated, especially if math is not your thing. If your child’s special needs put pressure on your resources, financial anxiety can make a tough situation worse.

 

Small Steps, Big Results

Financial experts say that starting small is the most effective way to make progress. You can get a grip on your spending patterns without creating a detailed budget. The most important first step is to put together an overall financial picture of your basic monthly income and expenses. Just seeing where your money goes can suggest ways to spend less. Does your internet bill look too big? There might be a way to change providers or downscale to fewer services. Surprised at how much you spend per month on workday lunches? You can try bringing lunch for a week or two and see how it goes.  

Track More, Stress Less

The ability to track what you spend can actually lower your anxiety about money and help you start developing goals based on your priorities.  It could be saving for a big purchase or reducing your debts. It could be having a cushion of funds on hand to cover unexpected expenses such as car repair or a medical bill.  Information is power. It gives you more control over your life. Check out our “My Financial Picture” worksheet to help you create a financial picture for you and/or your family. 

Wendy Besmann

Wendy Besmann is the Executive Director of Get There Project. Her books include Family Road Map: A Step-By-Step Guide to Navigating Health, Education, and Insurance Systems for Families with Special Needs, Young Adult Road Map: A Step-By-Step Guide to Wellness, Independent Living, and Transition Services for People in Their Teens and Twenties, and Team Up for Your Child, A Step-By-Step Guide to Working Smarter with Doctors, Schools, Insurers, and Agencies. She and her husband Ted have two sons, Elliot and David, who live with special needs. Wendy and Ted split their time between Knoxville, Tennessee and the University of South Carolina campus, where Ted is an engineering professor and Wendy is a "vintage" grad student in Public Health.

Leave a Comment





Categories